Seed Library

gardening tools with sprouts and seeds on green background

March 15 2022

CBRL is once again offering patrons access to high-quality vegetable and edible flower seeds.

This year, we will invite people to gather their own seed packets from self-serve stations in seven branches. While some packets will be pre-filled, patrons will have the opportunity to package some seeds themselves. Each household can take up to ten seed packets (one per variety).

Seed Library stations will be set up by March 29th at:

  • Baddeck
  • Glace Bay
  • Ingonish
  • Louisbourg
  • New Waterford
  • North Sydney
  • Sydney

Download the seed catalogue (pdf) or browse the list below to see which varieties our libraries will have in stock when the seed library opens.


CBRL Seed library logo round green on green

2022 Seed Catalogue


Seeds for the 2022 Seed Library were sourced from:
• Halifax Seed
• William Dam Seeds
• Seeds of Diversity, Cape Breton
• All Green Organic Farm, Little Bras d’Or

About Heritage Seeds

Heritage seeds are open-pollinated varieties (not hybrids) that have been bred true from saved seeds for at least 50 years and often much longer. Heritage varieties evolved over time making use of both natural and human selection to develop plants that thrive in local conditions, have great taste and often offer superior nutritional content. They include Heirloom varieties that have been passed down through generations within families.


BEANS


Beans: Beans are high in fibre, iron and essential minerals and form a complete protein when eaten with grains. Easy to grow, beans also benefit your garden by converting nitrogen from the air into a form usable by plants.
Growing Tips: Plant beans in well-drained soil after all danger of frost has passed. Sow seeds 2.5cm (1″) deep, 4 cm (1 ½”) apart, in rows 50cm (20″) apart. For a continual harvest of fresh beans, plant new rows every 10 days until mid-July. An application of Garden Legume Inoculant will offer increased yields. Avoid contact with bean plants when they are damp to prevent the spread of fungal diseases (Halifax Seed, 2021).

Top Notch Golden Wax Bean

This bush bean has creamy yellow pods that are 14cm (5 ½”) long, flat, straight and stringless. The 38-45cm (15-18″) high plants offer a heavy yield of tender, tasty beans. Suitable for containers.
Seed Source: Halifax Seed; Photo Credit: Halifax Seed

Improved Tendergreen Bean

High-yielding plants produce 15cm (6″) long, round, dark green beans that are tender and stringless. Resistant to Bean Mosaic Virus, this variety is delicious fresh, frozen or canned.
Seed Source: Halifax Seed; Photo Credit: Halifax Seed

Horochuk Bean (Heritage)

This bean was brought to Cape Breton from Ukraine around 1906 by the Horochuk family. It is a vigorous pole bean, producing a heavy crop of yellow European style slicing beans. Must have a trellis or other support. Plant directly in ground in June. Seed depth 5cm (2″), with 15cm (6″) between plants. Install a sturdy trellis before you plant your pole beans.
Seed Source: Seeds of Diversity Cape Breton.

Iannetti Bean (Heritage)

This bean was brought to Cape Breton from Brittoli, Italy, around 1902 by the Iannetti family. It is a vigorous pole bean, producing a heavy crop of green European-style slicing beans. Must have a trellis or other support. Plant directly in ground in June. Seed depth 5cm (2″), with 15cm (6″) between plants. Install a sturdy trellis before you plant your pole beans.
Seed Source: Seeds of Diversity Cape Breton


COMPANION FLOWERS

Borage (attracts pollinators / edible)

An easy to grow annual with large fuzzy leaves that have a cucumber flavour. The blue flowers can be used to add colour and taste to drinks and salads. Borage deters hornworm and cabbage worms, and is particularly useful planted near tomatoes and strawberries. Plant directly in ground after last frost. Seed depth 0.5-1cm (¼”-½”).
Seed Source: William Dam Seeds; Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons


Phacelia (attracts pollinators)

Phacelia, also called Purple Tansy or Lacy Phacelia, is native to North America and is widely used to attract bees and beneficial insects and to condition soil. It has hairy toothed leaves and light purple flowers. It tolerates cold temperatures well and keeps blooming into the fall to provide a source of high-quality nectar and pollen for bees. Needs darkness to germinate, so cover seeds well with 0.5cm (¼”) of soil.
Seed Source: William Dam Seeds; Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Nasturtium – Alaska Mix (Heritage, edible)

Foliage and flowers are edible and often tossed in salads to add a peppery flavour. A natural companion in the vegetable garden, nasturtiums trap and discourage harmful insects. A mix of vibrant red, orange, gold, peach and apricot flowers grow above the 30cm (12″) high foliage. Unique bright green and white marbled leaves.
Seed Source: Halifax Seed; Photo Credit: Halifax Seed


Mid-East Cucumber, Mercury F-1 (Pickling/Slicing)

This Beit Alpha type cucumber is popular in the Middle East. Exceptionally early and productive. High yields of slender mini cucumbers. Outstanding sweetness, crisp flesh and shiny dark green colour. Strong semi-vining plants. Immature fruits 10-15cm (4-6”) are great for pickling; fruits grow to 20cm (8”) for slicing.
Seed Source: William Dam Seeds; Photo Credit: William Dam Seeds

Straight 8 Cucumber (Slicing)

Produces a bounty of dark green 18-20cm (7-8″) long cucumbers that are tolerant to Cucumber Mosaic Virus. Trellis support an option.
Seed Source: Halifax Seed; Photo Credit: Halifax Seed


Vates Green Ruffled Kale

A green ruffled leaf that is great for baby greens. Vates has a nice medium dark green leaf with just enough curl to give loft in baby green mixes.
Seed Source: William Dam Seeds, Photo credit: William Dam Seeds

Organic Kale

Kale can be planted three to five weeks prior to your area’s projected last frost date in the spring. It also can be planted in the late summer roughly six to eight weeks before your first fall frost. Seeds should germinate in 7-10 days. Sow 3-4 seeds 5mm (¼”) deep in each spot you where a plant is to grow. Thin to the strongest plant. Space 45-60cm (18-24”) apart in rows 75-90cm (30-36”) apart.
Seed Source: All Green Organic Farm, Little Bras D’Or; Photo credit: All Green Organic Farm


Parris Island Cos Lettuce (Heritage)

Popular dark green strain of Cos lettuce (Romaine type). 25-30cm (10-12”) heads of slightly savoyed, dark green leaves with creamy white hearts. Popular for baby leaf. Best for spring and fall growing. Tolerant to tip-burn and mosaic, medium resistance to bolting. 66-70 days.
Seed Source: William Dam Seeds; Photo Credit: Johnny’s Selected Seeds

Grand Rapids Leaf Lettuce

A popular variety for early outdoor planting, or cold frames with medium-green, curly leaves and good taste. For spring and fall culture. Tip-burn resistant. 45 days.
Seed Source: William Dam Seeds; Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons


Little Marvel Peas (Heritage)

Shelling pea, bush type. An old (1934) All American Selections winner. This favourite has delicious sweet peas and is perfect for the home garden. Dwarf vines grow 45cm (18″) tall and produce deep green 7.5cm (3″) long pods that are tightly packed with 7-8 sweet, tender peas. Great fresh or for freezing. Suitable for containers. Direct sow May-June, Full – Part sun. 63 days.
Seed Source: Halifax Seed; Photo Credit: Halifax Seed

Cascadia Peas

Edible pod, bush type. Very sweet, round, plump pods that withstand summer heat. Larger and more vigorous, and tends to produce a larger plump pod with sweeter taste, than other summer types. Cascadia produces 3” medium-green pods on strong 24-28” plants. Support optional. Direct sow in early spring, Full—Part sun. 68 days.
Seed Source: William Dam Seeds, Photo Credit: CC Grow

Grey Sugar Dwarf Snow Pea (Heritage)

Edible pod, Climbing type. This old-time favourite edible-pod snow pea has purple flowers. Though called Dwarf, the vines grow 5-6’ tall, so will definitely need support (fence or trellis). They produce 6-7cm (2 ½”-3″) flat pods that are pale green, sweet and stringless. Tasty fresh, sauteed or frozen. Direct sow May—June, Full—Part sun. 60 days.
Seed Source: Halifax Seed; Photo Credit: Halifax Seed


Cherry Belle Radish (Heritage)

One of the most popular radish varieties. Excels in early spring and fall and is good for cold frame growing. The globe to round-shaped roots have scarlet red skin and tasty white flesh. The tops grow 8cm (3″) tall. Direct sow periodically all season for continued harvest. Full – Part sun, 21-26 days.
Seed Source: William Dam Seeds; Photo Credit: Halifax Seed


Bloomsdale Dark Green Spinach (Heritage)

This old standard home garden variety from the early 19th century produces heavy yields of glossy, dark green, blistered leaves in a prostrate growth habit. Likes cool weather so plant in spring and early fall – it can overwinter with a minimum of cover. Direct sow in Full sun. Suitable for containers. 50 days.
Seed Source: William Dam Seeds; Photo Credit: https://www.johnnyseeds.com


Table Queen Acorn Squash (Heritage)

This traditional acorn squash bears a generous harvest of dark green, grooved acorn-shaped fruits that measure approximately 13x10cm (4×5″). The medium thick flesh is pale orange, dry and sweet with a distinct flavour. Direct sow mid May – mid June. Full sun. 80 days.
Seed Source: Halifax Seed and William Dam Seeds, Photo Credit: Halifax Seed

Burgess Buttercup Squash

This popular winter squash has dark green fruits with golden orange, stringless flesh and a sweet, rich flavour. It typically produces 10-12 fruits per plant, on sprawling vines that can reach up to 4.5m (15′) in length. Fruits are 3-5 lbs each and store well. Start indoors in May or direct sow in June, Full sun, plant height 30-90cm (1-3’). 50-100 days.
Seed Source: Halifax Seed; Photo Credit: Halifax Seed

Waltham Butternut Squash

Uniform 4-5 lb fruits have smooth, tan skin and delicious, smooth textured orange flesh that is excellent when baked or in soups. Stores well. Start indoors in May or direct sow in June, Full sun. Plant height 30-90cm (1-3’), on vines ranging from 1.8-4.5m (6-15)’. 100 days.
Seed Source: Halifax Seed; Photo Credit: Halifax Seed

Black Beauty Zucchini (Heritage)

The dark green fruits of this versatile, delicious summer squash are borne on open bush-type plants, making them very easy to harvest. Flesh is light green in colour and delicately flavoured. Harvest the cylindrical fruits young for optimum tenderness.
Seed Source: Halifax Seed; Photo Credit: Halifax Seed


Candyland Hybrid Currant Tomato

Candyland produces a very high yield of tiny 1.5cm (½”) red fruit with a very sweet flavour burst that are great for salads or snacking. It is easy to grow and produces earlier than other sprawling open pollinated currant tomatoes. Branched trusses are accessible for yielding more usable fruit with less damage while picking. Requires support. 62 days.
Seed Source: William Dam Seeds; Photo credit: www.gardensalive.com

Rideau Cherry Tomato

From a collection of cherry tomato seeds from the national seed bank sent to Michelle Smith of Seeds of Diversity in Cape Breton for cataloguing and typing. This cherry tomato was outstanding, being crack resistant even in our damp fall weather, and deliciously sweet as a cherry tomato should be. An indeterminate variety that does well when allowed to sprawl but can be staked.
Seed Source: Seeds of Diversity; Photo credit: Colour Paradise Greenhouses

Scotia Tomato

A Maritime tradition, Scotia offers very early globe-shaped fruits that are medium-sized, smooth, firm and upon maturity turn deep red with slightly green shoulders. This dependable crop, a favorite ingredient for green tomato relish, is borne heavily on strong, determinate plants.
Source: Halifax Seed; Photo credit: Halifax Seed

Sprint Tomato

A very early, cold-tolerant tomato, with a bright, fresh taste. Originally developed by Johnny’s Selected Seeds thirty years ago, it is no longer commercially available but  has been preserved by a group of Cape Breton enthusiasts. Will keep setting fruit until killed by frost, even when the weather gets a bit cool. A semi-determinate, potato leaf variety that does well when allowed to sprawl but can be staked.

Seed Source: Seeds of Diversity; Photo credit: Colour Paradise Greenhouses

The CBRL Seed Library is funded by the Nova Scotia Department of Communities, Culture and Heritage. Planning support by Seeds of Diversity, Cape Breton

 
Happy Gardening!